Orphaned Children

 

For children from China, Myanmar and West Bank, we are unable to display their profiles online due to government regulations. If you prefer to sponsor children from these countries, please fill up this form for us to send you child profiles.

The U.N defines an orphan as a child who has lost one or both parents. These children have lost or have been abandoned by one or both parents.
 

Hi, my name is Gilbert.

I am a 10-year-old boy from Zambia.

My father abandoned me.

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Hi, my name is Kilan.

I am a 10-year-old boy from Zambia.

My father abandoned me.

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Hi, my name is Truong Ve Kien.

I am a 3-year-old boy from Vietnam.

My father abandoned me.

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Hi, my name is Munkhod.

I am a 9-year-old boy from Mongolia.

I lost my father.

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Hi, my name is Fikiru.

I am a 6-year-old boy from Ethiopia.

I lost my father.

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Hi, my name is Rosemary.

I am a 9-year-old girl from Zambia.

My father abandoned me.

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Hi, my name is Nomin.

I am a 9-year-old girl from Mongolia.

Both my parents abandoned me.

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Hi, my name is Fanos.

I am a 5-year-old girl from Ethiopia.

I lost my father.

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Hi, my name is Feyise.

I am a 7-year-old girl from Ethiopia.

I lost my father.

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Hi, my name is Jargaltulga.

I am a 10-year-old boy from Mongolia.

I lost my father.

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Hi, my name is Collins.

I am a 9-year-old boy from Zambia.

My father abandoned me.

Learn more about me

My name is Gilbert

My birthday is on 11 Aug 2010
My favourite subject is Local language
I like playing Football

Zambia, Musosolokwe ADP

World Vision began an assessment study in Musosolokwe in July 2009. It was found that the target area was hampered by insufficient health facilities, ill-equipped schools and a lack of food security. Children had to walk long distances to reach medical centres that were inadequately stocked, schools lacked necessary items like desks and learning materials and food was not available all year round. Recognising these needs, the Musosolokwe ADP began its initiatives in April 2010.

The harsh landscape in Musosolokwe deprives children of a fair chance at education. Children have to cover over 25 km to reach one of three schools in the area. Flooding also destroys roads and flood waters can wash away and drown children.

In addition, there is a high rate of malaria, diarrhoea and malnutrition among children. This leads to high mortality and stunted growth in children, which further perpetuates poverty in Musosolokwe.

Also, over 40% of children have only one meal a day due to poor crop harvest as a result of bad weather conditions and poor farming methods. Alternative sources of income are hard to come by, and natural resources in Musosolokwe are slowly being exploited by the community to earn more income.

My name is Kilan

My birthday is on 3 Nov 2009
My favourite subject is English
I like playing Running

Zambia, Musosolokwe ADP

World Vision began an assessment study in Musosolokwe in July 2009. It was found that the target area was hampered by insufficient health facilities, ill-equipped schools and a lack of food security. Children had to walk long distances to reach medical centres that were inadequately stocked, schools lacked necessary items like desks and learning materials and food was not available all year round. Recognising these needs, the Musosolokwe ADP began its initiatives in April 2010.

The harsh landscape in Musosolokwe deprives children of a fair chance at education. Children have to cover over 25 km to reach one of three schools in the area. Flooding also destroys roads and flood waters can wash away and drown children.

In addition, there is a high rate of malaria, diarrhoea and malnutrition among children. This leads to high mortality and stunted growth in children, which further perpetuates poverty in Musosolokwe.

Also, over 40% of children have only one meal a day due to poor crop harvest as a result of bad weather conditions and poor farming methods. Alternative sources of income are hard to come by, and natural resources in Musosolokwe are slowly being exploited by the community to earn more income.

My name is Truong Ve Kien

My birthday is on 10 Jan 2017
My favourite subject is None
I like playing Ball games

Vietnam, Son Tra ADP

While urbanisation rapidly spreads in Son Tra district, children from poor families continue to struggle to meet their basic needs. Almost one in five people live on less than US$2 per day and there are gaps in the areas of housing, transportation and education.

As the area develops, there is an increase in hotels and tourism. But locals are ill-equipped for this change as they lack formal education and technical skills. As a result, they have challenges gaining employment and providing for their children’s basic needs.

The district has the highest rate of stunting in the city, with 18.5% of children under the age of five being affected. Diarrhoea, acute respiratory infections, dengue and pneumonia are common diseases among children between 0-14 years old as poor families cannot afford proper healthcare from qualified practitioners.

Parents of poor families spend almost all their time struggling to make a living. As a result, their children are neglected and lack care, guidance and supervision.

In light of these needs, World Vision started the implementation of Son Tra ADP in 2015. Through consultation and cooperation with community representatives and the local government, the project aims to improve the well-being of children.

My name is Munkhod

My birthday is on 6 Apr 2011
My favourite subject is Mathematics
I like playing Toys

Mongolia, Selenge ADP

Selenge is located in northeast Mongolia near the Russian border. It is between the Orkhon and Selenge river basins and the hills and mountains in the forest steppe regions.

In Selenge, about 30% of the population live in poverty. The community faces persistent unemployment after an economic downturn. Families struggle with job loss and limited opportunities for businesses and self employment. They also face challenges in child protection, economic development and education. Poor environmental hygiene and sanitation issues have also led to epidemic outbreaks and put children's lives at risk. 

Mongolia’s harsh climate, poorly developed infrastructure, persistent poverty, and nomadic herding lifestyle increase risk of loss of livelihood due to natural hazards. Driven by poverty, many children work illegally in surrounding mines, raising school dropout rates and huge child protection concerns.

My name is Fikiru

My birthday is on 25 Apr 2014
My favourite subject is Spelling
I like playing Running

Ethiopia, Yaya Gulele ADP

World Vision Singapore has been funding Yaya Gulele ADP since its inception in 2007. Working in tandem with national governmental policies and other agencies for the eradication of poverty and transformational development in Ethiopia, this programme seeks to help families in the target areas achieve livelihood security on a sustainable basis. 

Ethiopia ranks 173 out of 189 countries on the 2017 Human Development Index. The average household income is US$100 per month and 34.7% of the population live below the poverty line. A majority of the population are farmers engaged in mixed cultivation and livestock rearing. 

In Yaya Gulele ADP, more than 50% of children have not gained functional literacy. Inadequate school materials and limited access to updated teaching methodologies contribute to students not being engaged in school. As such, they prefer to do income generating activities like farming instead of going to school.

Also, there is a high level of need in the areas of healthcare, sanitation and clean water. The causes are poor sanitation practices, poor waste disposal and open defecation. Due to the inability to have a balanced diet and age appropriate food, mothers and children are malnourished.

My name is Rosemary

My birthday is on 28 Dec 2010
My favourite subject is English
I like playing Ball games

Zambia, Musosolokwe ADP

World Vision began an assessment study in Musosolokwe in July 2009. It was found that the target area was hampered by insufficient health facilities, ill-equipped schools and a lack of food security. Children had to walk long distances to reach medical centres that were inadequately stocked, schools lacked necessary items like desks and learning materials and food was not available all year round. Recognising these needs, the Musosolokwe ADP began its initiatives in April 2010.

The harsh landscape in Musosolokwe deprives children of a fair chance at education. Children have to cover over 25 km to reach one of three schools in the area. Flooding also destroys roads and flood waters can wash away and drown children.

In addition, there is a high rate of malaria, diarrhoea and malnutrition among children. This leads to high mortality and stunted growth in children, which further perpetuates poverty in Musosolokwe.

Also, over 40% of children have only one meal a day due to poor crop harvest as a result of bad weather conditions and poor farming methods. Alternative sources of income are hard to come by, and natural resources in Musosolokwe are slowly being exploited by the community to earn more income.

My name is Nomin

My birthday is on 29 May 2011
My favourite subject is Physical education
I like playing Group games

Mongolia, Selenge ADP

Selenge is located in northeast Mongolia near the Russian border. It is between the Orkhon and Selenge river basins and the hills and mountains in the forest steppe regions.

In Selenge, about 30% of the population live in poverty. The community faces persistent unemployment after an economic downturn. Families struggle with job loss and limited opportunities for businesses and self employment. They also face challenges in child protection, economic development and education. Poor environmental hygiene and sanitation issues have also led to epidemic outbreaks and put children's lives at risk. 

Mongolia’s harsh climate, poorly developed infrastructure, persistent poverty, and nomadic herding lifestyle increase risk of loss of livelihood due to natural hazards. Driven by poverty, many children work illegally in surrounding mines, raising school dropout rates and huge child protection concerns.

My name is Fanos

My birthday is on 1 Jul 2015
My favourite subject is Spelling
I like playing Hide and seek

Ethiopia, Yaya Gulele ADP

World Vision Singapore has been funding Yaya Gulele ADP since its inception in 2007. Working in tandem with national governmental policies and other agencies for the eradication of poverty and transformational development in Ethiopia, this programme seeks to help families in the target areas achieve livelihood security on a sustainable basis. 

Ethiopia ranks 173 out of 189 countries on the 2017 Human Development Index. The average household income is US$100 per month and 34.7% of the population live below the poverty line. A majority of the population are farmers engaged in mixed cultivation and livestock rearing. 

In Yaya Gulele ADP, more than 50% of children have not gained functional literacy. Inadequate school materials and limited access to updated teaching methodologies contribute to students not being engaged in school. As such, they prefer to do income generating activities like farming instead of going to school.

Also, there is a high level of need in the areas of healthcare, sanitation and clean water. The causes are poor sanitation practices, poor waste disposal and open defecation. Due to the inability to have a balanced diet and age appropriate food, mothers and children are malnourished.

My name is Feyise

My birthday is on 23 Dec 2012
My favourite subject is Number counting
I like playing Running

Ethiopia, Yaya Gulele ADP

World Vision Singapore has been funding Yaya Gulele ADP since its inception in 2007. Working in tandem with national governmental policies and other agencies for the eradication of poverty and transformational development in Ethiopia, this programme seeks to help families in the target areas achieve livelihood security on a sustainable basis. 

Ethiopia ranks 173 out of 189 countries on the 2017 Human Development Index. The average household income is US$100 per month and 34.7% of the population live below the poverty line. A majority of the population are farmers engaged in mixed cultivation and livestock rearing. 

In Yaya Gulele ADP, more than 50% of children have not gained functional literacy. Inadequate school materials and limited access to updated teaching methodologies contribute to students not being engaged in school. As such, they prefer to do income generating activities like farming instead of going to school.

Also, there is a high level of need in the areas of healthcare, sanitation and clean water. The causes are poor sanitation practices, poor waste disposal and open defecation. Due to the inability to have a balanced diet and age appropriate food, mothers and children are malnourished.

My name is Jargaltulga

My birthday is on 14 Jul 2010
My favourite subject is Physical education
I like playing Football

Mongolia, Selenge ADP

Selenge is located in northeast Mongolia near the Russian border. It is between the Orkhon and Selenge river basins and the hills and mountains in the forest steppe regions.

In Selenge, about 30% of the population live in poverty. The community faces persistent unemployment after an economic downturn. Families struggle with job loss and limited opportunities for businesses and self employment. They also face challenges in child protection, economic development and education. Poor environmental hygiene and sanitation issues have also led to epidemic outbreaks and put children's lives at risk. 

Mongolia’s harsh climate, poorly developed infrastructure, persistent poverty, and nomadic herding lifestyle increase risk of loss of livelihood due to natural hazards. Driven by poverty, many children work illegally in surrounding mines, raising school dropout rates and huge child protection concerns.

My name is Collins

My birthday is on 9 Sep 2011
My favourite subject is Local language
I like playing Football

Zambia, Musosolokwe ADP

World Vision began an assessment study in Musosolokwe in July 2009. It was found that the target area was hampered by insufficient health facilities, ill-equipped schools and a lack of food security. Children had to walk long distances to reach medical centres that were inadequately stocked, schools lacked necessary items like desks and learning materials and food was not available all year round. Recognising these needs, the Musosolokwe ADP began its initiatives in April 2010.

The harsh landscape in Musosolokwe deprives children of a fair chance at education. Children have to cover over 25 km to reach one of three schools in the area. Flooding also destroys roads and flood waters can wash away and drown children.

In addition, there is a high rate of malaria, diarrhoea and malnutrition among children. This leads to high mortality and stunted growth in children, which further perpetuates poverty in Musosolokwe.

Also, over 40% of children have only one meal a day due to poor crop harvest as a result of bad weather conditions and poor farming methods. Alternative sources of income are hard to come by, and natural resources in Musosolokwe are slowly being exploited by the community to earn more income.


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