Longest Waiting Children

For just $45 a month, you can help these children and their communities to stand tall, free from poverty.
This page shows children who have been waiting for a sponsor for 12 months or more. End their wait today!

 For children from ChinaMyanmarVietnam and West Bank, we are unable to display their profiles online due to government regulations. If you prefer to sponsor children from these countries, or are unable to find a child here that meets your criteria, please fill up this form for us to send you child profiles. Alternatively, you can contact us at 6922 0144 or via Facebook Messenger at the bottom right of the page.

 

Find a child to sponsor

Hi, my name is Priyashan.

I am a 5-year-old boy from Sri Lanka.

Waiting for 1 year 3 weeks

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Hi, my name is Dilrukshan.

I am a 9-year-old boy from Sri Lanka.

Waiting for 1 year 1 month

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Hi, my name is Santhosh.

I am a 8-year-old boy from Sri Lanka.

Waiting for 5 years 9 months

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Hi, my name is Dhashoshan.

I am a 10-year-old boy from Sri Lanka.

Waiting for 4 years 10 months

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Hi, my name is Glaspy.

I am a 9-year-old boy from Sri Lanka.

Waiting for 4 years 10 months

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Hi, my name is Fransraj.

I am a 7-year-old boy from Sri Lanka.

Waiting for 4 years 9 months

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Hi, my name is Dharshan.

I am a 10-year-old boy from Sri Lanka.

Waiting for 4 years 9 months

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Hi, my name is Yathurshan.

I am a 7-year-old boy from Sri Lanka.

Waiting for 4 years 9 months

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Hi, my name is Umesh.

I am a 9-year-old boy from Sri Lanka.

Waiting for 4 years 9 months

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Hi, my name is Logan.

I am a 8-year-old boy from Sri Lanka.

Waiting for 4 years 9 months

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Hi, my name is Kowshik.

I am a 8-year-old boy from Sri Lanka.

Waiting for 4 years 9 months

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Hi, my name is Thibeeshan.

I am a 7-year-old boy from Sri Lanka.

Waiting for 4 years 9 months

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Hi, my name is Rogith.

I am a 9-year-old boy from Sri Lanka.

Waiting for 3 years 1 month

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Hi, my name is Jesica Olivia Wunu.

I am a 12-year-old girl from Indonesia.

Waiting for 1 year 1 month

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Hi, my name is Vithurshanie.

I am a 12-year-old girl from Sri Lanka.

Waiting for 1 year 2 months

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Hi, my name is Lalilina.

I am a 9-year-old girl from Sri Lanka.

Waiting for 1 year 2 months

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Hi, my name is Dominikus Lexianus.

I am a 12-year-old boy from Indonesia.

Waiting for 2 years 6 months

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Hi, my name is Ignasius Putra.

I am a 12-year-old boy from Indonesia.

Waiting for 2 years 6 months

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Hi, my name is Jonmans.

I am a 12-year-old boy from Indonesia.

Waiting for 2 years 6 months

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Hi, my name is Makarius Notaras.

I am a 12-year-old boy from Indonesia.

Waiting for 2 years 6 months

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Hi, my name is Maria Magdalena Gala.

I am a 12-year-old girl from Indonesia.

Waiting for 1 year 2 months

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Hi, my name is Anastasia Maria.

I am a 12-year-old girl from Indonesia.

Waiting for 1 year 1 month

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Hi, my name is Katarina Kristofora.

I am a 12-year-old girl from Indonesia.

Waiting for 1 year 5 months

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Hi, my name is Thiranjana.

I am a 10-year-old girl from Sri Lanka.

Waiting for 2 years 10 months

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Hi, my name is SARANYA.

I am a 12-year-old girl from Sri Lanka.

Waiting for 2 years 10 months

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Hi, my name is Rifkka.

I am a 12-year-old girl from Sri Lanka.

Waiting for 2 years 10 months

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Hi, my name is Vinojini.

I am a 12-year-old girl from Sri Lanka.

Waiting for 2 years 10 months

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Hi, my name is Rishyanthini.

I am a 3-year-old girl from Sri Lanka.

Waiting for 2 years 10 months

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Hi, my name is Sasmitha.

I am a 3-year-old girl from Sri Lanka.

Waiting for 2 years 10 months

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Hi, my name is CHAMILA.

I am a 12-year-old girl from Sri Lanka.

Waiting for 1 year 7 months

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Hi, my name is Mahelini Niv.

I am a 3-year-old girl from Sri Lanka.

Waiting for 2 years 10 months

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Hi, my name is Dhushika.

I am a 3-year-old girl from Sri Lanka.

Waiting for 2 years 10 months

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My name is Priyashan

My birthday is on 12 Feb 2014
My favourite subject is Coloring
I like playing Toys

Sri Lanka, Lindula ADP

World Vision has been involved with Sri Lanka’s tea estate workers for many years and Lindula ADP is an extension of this work. Tea plantation workers have been marginalised in Sri Lanka for a very long time. Originally brought in from South India over 150 years ago, they were eventually exploited for work and isolated from the rest of the country. World Vision’s interventions focus on the well-being of children to ensure that their health, nutrition, education and social needs are met.

In Lindula ADP, majority of the people work as pickers and labourers in the tea estates. They are paid daily, and when work is not available, they face a severe shortage of income.

Also, children lack proper education, and 45% of the population under 12 years old are illiterate. This is due to long travel distances, poor transport facilities and lack of finances for education resulting in a dropout rate of 14.5%, almost 10 times the national average.

In terms of healthcare and child protection challenges, 74% of people live in dismal housing. Whole families live in a single room that is linked to others to form a “line house”. There is little ventilation, no privacy, and conditions are often unsanitary. Only 67.1% of households have their own latrines and the remaining families share common latrines or defecate in open areas.

My name is Dilrukshan

My birthday is on 9 Aug 2010
My favourite subject is Drawing
I like playing Cricket

Sri Lanka, Lindula ADP

World Vision has been involved with Sri Lanka’s tea estate workers for many years and Lindula ADP is an extension of this work. Tea plantation workers have been marginalised in Sri Lanka for a very long time. Originally brought in from South India over 150 years ago, they were eventually exploited for work and isolated from the rest of the country. World Vision’s interventions focus on the well-being of children to ensure that their health, nutrition, education and social needs are met.

In Lindula ADP, majority of the people work as pickers and labourers in the tea estates. They are paid daily, and when work is not available, they face a severe shortage of income.

Also, children lack proper education, and 45% of the population under 12 years old are illiterate. This is due to long travel distances, poor transport facilities and lack of finances for education resulting in a dropout rate of 14.5%, almost 10 times the national average.

In terms of healthcare and child protection challenges, 74% of people live in dismal housing. Whole families live in a single room that is linked to others to form a “line house”. There is little ventilation, no privacy, and conditions are often unsanitary. Only 67.1% of households have their own latrines and the remaining families share common latrines or defecate in open areas.

My name is Santhosh

My birthday is on 22 Jul 2011
My favourite subject is Local language
I like playing Cricket

Sri Lanka, Lindula ADP

World Vision has been involved with Sri Lanka’s tea estate workers for many years and Lindula ADP is an extension of this work. Tea plantation workers have been marginalised in Sri Lanka for a very long time. Originally brought in from South India over 150 years ago, they were eventually exploited for work and isolated from the rest of the country. World Vision’s interventions focus on the well-being of children to ensure that their health, nutrition, education and social needs are met.

In Lindula ADP, majority of the people work as pickers and labourers in the tea estates. They are paid daily, and when work is not available, they face a severe shortage of income.

Also, children lack proper education, and 45% of the population under 12 years old are illiterate. This is due to long travel distances, poor transport facilities and lack of finances for education resulting in a dropout rate of 14.5%, almost 10 times the national average.

In terms of healthcare and child protection challenges, 74% of people live in dismal housing. Whole families live in a single room that is linked to others to form a “line house”. There is little ventilation, no privacy, and conditions are often unsanitary. Only 67.1% of households have their own latrines and the remaining families share common latrines or defecate in open areas.

My name is Dhashoshan

My birthday is on 13 Aug 2009
My favourite subject is Coloring
I like playing Cricket

Sri Lanka, Lindula ADP

World Vision has been involved with Sri Lanka’s tea estate workers for many years and Lindula ADP is an extension of this work. Tea plantation workers have been marginalised in Sri Lanka for a very long time. Originally brought in from South India over 150 years ago, they were eventually exploited for work and isolated from the rest of the country. World Vision’s interventions focus on the well-being of children to ensure that their health, nutrition, education and social needs are met.

In Lindula ADP, majority of the people work as pickers and labourers in the tea estates. They are paid daily, and when work is not available, they face a severe shortage of income.

Also, children lack proper education, and 45% of the population under 12 years old are illiterate. This is due to long travel distances, poor transport facilities and lack of finances for education resulting in a dropout rate of 14.5%, almost 10 times the national average.

In terms of healthcare and child protection challenges, 74% of people live in dismal housing. Whole families live in a single room that is linked to others to form a “line house”. There is little ventilation, no privacy, and conditions are often unsanitary. Only 67.1% of households have their own latrines and the remaining families share common latrines or defecate in open areas.

My name is Glaspy

My birthday is on 25 Oct 2009
My favourite subject is Mathematics
I like playing Ball games

Sri Lanka, Lindula ADP

World Vision has been involved with Sri Lanka’s tea estate workers for many years and Lindula ADP is an extension of this work. Tea plantation workers have been marginalised in Sri Lanka for a very long time. Originally brought in from South India over 150 years ago, they were eventually exploited for work and isolated from the rest of the country. World Vision’s interventions focus on the well-being of children to ensure that their health, nutrition, education and social needs are met.

In Lindula ADP, majority of the people work as pickers and labourers in the tea estates. They are paid daily, and when work is not available, they face a severe shortage of income.

Also, children lack proper education, and 45% of the population under 12 years old are illiterate. This is due to long travel distances, poor transport facilities and lack of finances for education resulting in a dropout rate of 14.5%, almost 10 times the national average.

In terms of healthcare and child protection challenges, 74% of people live in dismal housing. Whole families live in a single room that is linked to others to form a “line house”. There is little ventilation, no privacy, and conditions are often unsanitary. Only 67.1% of households have their own latrines and the remaining families share common latrines or defecate in open areas.

My name is Fransraj

My birthday is on 21 Sep 2011
My favourite subject is Foreign language
I like playing Building blocks

Sri Lanka, Lindula ADP

World Vision has been involved with Sri Lanka’s tea estate workers for many years and Lindula ADP is an extension of this work. Tea plantation workers have been marginalised in Sri Lanka for a very long time. Originally brought in from South India over 150 years ago, they were eventually exploited for work and isolated from the rest of the country. World Vision’s interventions focus on the well-being of children to ensure that their health, nutrition, education and social needs are met.

In Lindula ADP, majority of the people work as pickers and labourers in the tea estates. They are paid daily, and when work is not available, they face a severe shortage of income.

Also, children lack proper education, and 45% of the population under 12 years old are illiterate. This is due to long travel distances, poor transport facilities and lack of finances for education resulting in a dropout rate of 14.5%, almost 10 times the national average.

In terms of healthcare and child protection challenges, 74% of people live in dismal housing. Whole families live in a single room that is linked to others to form a “line house”. There is little ventilation, no privacy, and conditions are often unsanitary. Only 67.1% of households have their own latrines and the remaining families share common latrines or defecate in open areas.

My name is Dharshan

My birthday is on 15 Mar 2009
My favourite subject is Local language
I like playing Ball games

Sri Lanka, Lindula ADP

World Vision has been involved with Sri Lanka’s tea estate workers for many years and Lindula ADP is an extension of this work. Tea plantation workers have been marginalised in Sri Lanka for a very long time. Originally brought in from South India over 150 years ago, they were eventually exploited for work and isolated from the rest of the country. World Vision’s interventions focus on the well-being of children to ensure that their health, nutrition, education and social needs are met.

In Lindula ADP, majority of the people work as pickers and labourers in the tea estates. They are paid daily, and when work is not available, they face a severe shortage of income.

Also, children lack proper education, and 45% of the population under 12 years old are illiterate. This is due to long travel distances, poor transport facilities and lack of finances for education resulting in a dropout rate of 14.5%, almost 10 times the national average.

In terms of healthcare and child protection challenges, 74% of people live in dismal housing. Whole families live in a single room that is linked to others to form a “line house”. There is little ventilation, no privacy, and conditions are often unsanitary. Only 67.1% of households have their own latrines and the remaining families share common latrines or defecate in open areas.

My name is Yathurshan

My birthday is on 10 May 2012
My favourite subject is Coloring
I like playing Ball games

Sri Lanka, Lindula ADP

World Vision has been involved with Sri Lanka’s tea estate workers for many years and Lindula ADP is an extension of this work. Tea plantation workers have been marginalised in Sri Lanka for a very long time. Originally brought in from South India over 150 years ago, they were eventually exploited for work and isolated from the rest of the country. World Vision’s interventions focus on the well-being of children to ensure that their health, nutrition, education and social needs are met.

In Lindula ADP, majority of the people work as pickers and labourers in the tea estates. They are paid daily, and when work is not available, they face a severe shortage of income.

Also, children lack proper education, and 45% of the population under 12 years old are illiterate. This is due to long travel distances, poor transport facilities and lack of finances for education resulting in a dropout rate of 14.5%, almost 10 times the national average.

In terms of healthcare and child protection challenges, 74% of people live in dismal housing. Whole families live in a single room that is linked to others to form a “line house”. There is little ventilation, no privacy, and conditions are often unsanitary. Only 67.1% of households have their own latrines and the remaining families share common latrines or defecate in open areas.

My name is Umesh

My birthday is on 23 Oct 2009
My favourite subject is Mathematics
I like playing Cricket

Sri Lanka, Lindula ADP

World Vision has been involved with Sri Lanka’s tea estate workers for many years and Lindula ADP is an extension of this work. Tea plantation workers have been marginalised in Sri Lanka for a very long time. Originally brought in from South India over 150 years ago, they were eventually exploited for work and isolated from the rest of the country. World Vision’s interventions focus on the well-being of children to ensure that their health, nutrition, education and social needs are met.

In Lindula ADP, majority of the people work as pickers and labourers in the tea estates. They are paid daily, and when work is not available, they face a severe shortage of income.

Also, children lack proper education, and 45% of the population under 12 years old are illiterate. This is due to long travel distances, poor transport facilities and lack of finances for education resulting in a dropout rate of 14.5%, almost 10 times the national average.

In terms of healthcare and child protection challenges, 74% of people live in dismal housing. Whole families live in a single room that is linked to others to form a “line house”. There is little ventilation, no privacy, and conditions are often unsanitary. Only 67.1% of households have their own latrines and the remaining families share common latrines or defecate in open areas.

My name is Logan

My birthday is on 15 Sep 2010
My favourite subject is Local language
I like playing Ball games

Sri Lanka, Lindula ADP

World Vision has been involved with Sri Lanka’s tea estate workers for many years and Lindula ADP is an extension of this work. Tea plantation workers have been marginalised in Sri Lanka for a very long time. Originally brought in from South India over 150 years ago, they were eventually exploited for work and isolated from the rest of the country. World Vision’s interventions focus on the well-being of children to ensure that their health, nutrition, education and social needs are met.

In Lindula ADP, majority of the people work as pickers and labourers in the tea estates. They are paid daily, and when work is not available, they face a severe shortage of income.

Also, children lack proper education, and 45% of the population under 12 years old are illiterate. This is due to long travel distances, poor transport facilities and lack of finances for education resulting in a dropout rate of 14.5%, almost 10 times the national average.

In terms of healthcare and child protection challenges, 74% of people live in dismal housing. Whole families live in a single room that is linked to others to form a “line house”. There is little ventilation, no privacy, and conditions are often unsanitary. Only 67.1% of households have their own latrines and the remaining families share common latrines or defecate in open areas.

My name is Kowshik

My birthday is on 23 Feb 2011
My favourite subject is Coloring
I like playing Building blocks

Sri Lanka, Lindula ADP

World Vision has been involved with Sri Lanka’s tea estate workers for many years and Lindula ADP is an extension of this work. Tea plantation workers have been marginalised in Sri Lanka for a very long time. Originally brought in from South India over 150 years ago, they were eventually exploited for work and isolated from the rest of the country. World Vision’s interventions focus on the well-being of children to ensure that their health, nutrition, education and social needs are met.

In Lindula ADP, majority of the people work as pickers and labourers in the tea estates. They are paid daily, and when work is not available, they face a severe shortage of income.

Also, children lack proper education, and 45% of the population under 12 years old are illiterate. This is due to long travel distances, poor transport facilities and lack of finances for education resulting in a dropout rate of 14.5%, almost 10 times the national average.

In terms of healthcare and child protection challenges, 74% of people live in dismal housing. Whole families live in a single room that is linked to others to form a “line house”. There is little ventilation, no privacy, and conditions are often unsanitary. Only 67.1% of households have their own latrines and the remaining families share common latrines or defecate in open areas.

My name is Thibeeshan

My birthday is on 3 Jun 2012
My favourite subject is Coloring
I like playing Ball games

Sri Lanka, Lindula ADP

World Vision has been involved with Sri Lanka’s tea estate workers for many years and Lindula ADP is an extension of this work. Tea plantation workers have been marginalised in Sri Lanka for a very long time. Originally brought in from South India over 150 years ago, they were eventually exploited for work and isolated from the rest of the country. World Vision’s interventions focus on the well-being of children to ensure that their health, nutrition, education and social needs are met.

In Lindula ADP, majority of the people work as pickers and labourers in the tea estates. They are paid daily, and when work is not available, they face a severe shortage of income.

Also, children lack proper education, and 45% of the population under 12 years old are illiterate. This is due to long travel distances, poor transport facilities and lack of finances for education resulting in a dropout rate of 14.5%, almost 10 times the national average.

In terms of healthcare and child protection challenges, 74% of people live in dismal housing. Whole families live in a single room that is linked to others to form a “line house”. There is little ventilation, no privacy, and conditions are often unsanitary. Only 67.1% of households have their own latrines and the remaining families share common latrines or defecate in open areas.

My name is Rogith

My birthday is on 19 Mar 2010
My favourite subject is Art
I like playing Ball games

Sri Lanka, Lindula ADP

World Vision has been involved with Sri Lanka’s tea estate workers for many years and Lindula ADP is an extension of this work. Tea plantation workers have been marginalised in Sri Lanka for a very long time. Originally brought in from South India over 150 years ago, they were eventually exploited for work and isolated from the rest of the country. World Vision’s interventions focus on the well-being of children to ensure that their health, nutrition, education and social needs are met.

In Lindula ADP, majority of the people work as pickers and labourers in the tea estates. They are paid daily, and when work is not available, they face a severe shortage of income.

Also, children lack proper education, and 45% of the population under 12 years old are illiterate. This is due to long travel distances, poor transport facilities and lack of finances for education resulting in a dropout rate of 14.5%, almost 10 times the national average.

In terms of healthcare and child protection challenges, 74% of people live in dismal housing. Whole families live in a single room that is linked to others to form a “line house”. There is little ventilation, no privacy, and conditions are often unsanitary. Only 67.1% of households have their own latrines and the remaining families share common latrines or defecate in open areas.

My name is Jesica Olivia Wunu

My birthday is on 9 Nov 2006
My favourite subject is Mathematics
I like playing Dolls

Indonesia, Ende ADP

World Vision started an ADP in 2014 after a thorough assessment of Ende in 2012. Measured against standard indicators of economic development needs, Ende emerged as an area where the vulnerability of children needed to be urgently addressed. 

In Ende, traditional attitudes towards children are harsh and unsympathetic. They are viewed as free labour and are often denied their right to study so that they can work to supplement the family income. Cases of physical and sexual abuse are not taken seriously and are unreported or left unsolved, affecting and scarring children emotionally and mentally. 

In terms of healthcare concerns, the main issues that compromise the health of children are the lack of access to clean water, the prevalence of unhygienic behaviours and poor sanitation systems. Approximately 40% of the community practices open defecation as there are no proper toilets. 

Also, Ende's economic development falls behind national statistics. Their main source of income is agriculture but the productivity of existing farming methods is low due to a lack of understanding, poor management, pests and diseases. 

My name is Vithurshanie

My birthday is on 20 Oct 2006
My favourite subject is Mathematics
I like playing Volleyball

Sri Lanka, Lindula ADP

World Vision has been involved with Sri Lanka’s tea estate workers for many years and Lindula ADP is an extension of this work. Tea plantation workers have been marginalised in Sri Lanka for a very long time. Originally brought in from South India over 150 years ago, they were eventually exploited for work and isolated from the rest of the country. World Vision’s interventions focus on the well-being of children to ensure that their health, nutrition, education and social needs are met.

In Lindula ADP, majority of the people work as pickers and labourers in the tea estates. They are paid daily, and when work is not available, they face a severe shortage of income.

Also, children lack proper education, and 45% of the population under 12 years old are illiterate. This is due to long travel distances, poor transport facilities and lack of finances for education resulting in a dropout rate of 14.5%, almost 10 times the national average.

In terms of healthcare and child protection challenges, 74% of people live in dismal housing. Whole families live in a single room that is linked to others to form a “line house”. There is little ventilation, no privacy, and conditions are often unsanitary. Only 67.1% of households have their own latrines and the remaining families share common latrines or defecate in open areas.

My name is Lalilina

My birthday is on 20 Feb 2010
My favourite subject is Coloring
I like playing Cricket

Sri Lanka, Lindula ADP

World Vision has been involved with Sri Lanka’s tea estate workers for many years and Lindula ADP is an extension of this work. Tea plantation workers have been marginalised in Sri Lanka for a very long time. Originally brought in from South India over 150 years ago, they were eventually exploited for work and isolated from the rest of the country. World Vision’s interventions focus on the well-being of children to ensure that their health, nutrition, education and social needs are met.

In Lindula ADP, majority of the people work as pickers and labourers in the tea estates. They are paid daily, and when work is not available, they face a severe shortage of income.

Also, children lack proper education, and 45% of the population under 12 years old are illiterate. This is due to long travel distances, poor transport facilities and lack of finances for education resulting in a dropout rate of 14.5%, almost 10 times the national average.

In terms of healthcare and child protection challenges, 74% of people live in dismal housing. Whole families live in a single room that is linked to others to form a “line house”. There is little ventilation, no privacy, and conditions are often unsanitary. Only 67.1% of households have their own latrines and the remaining families share common latrines or defecate in open areas.

My name is Dominikus Lexianus

My birthday is on 8 Nov 2006
My favourite subject is Religious studies
I like playing Toy cars

Indonesia, Ende ADP

World Vision started an ADP in 2014 after a thorough assessment of Ende in 2012. Measured against standard indicators of economic development needs, Ende emerged as an area where the vulnerability of children needed to be urgently addressed. 

In Ende, traditional attitudes towards children are harsh and unsympathetic. They are viewed as free labour and are often denied their right to study so that they can work to supplement the family income. Cases of physical and sexual abuse are not taken seriously and are unreported or left unsolved, affecting and scarring children emotionally and mentally. 

In terms of healthcare concerns, the main issues that compromise the health of children are the lack of access to clean water, the prevalence of unhygienic behaviours and poor sanitation systems. Approximately 40% of the community practices open defecation as there are no proper toilets. 

Also, Ende's economic development falls behind national statistics. Their main source of income is agriculture but the productivity of existing farming methods is low due to a lack of understanding, poor management, pests and diseases. 

My name is Ignasius Putra

My birthday is on 24 Nov 2006
My favourite subject is Science
I like playing Soccer

Indonesia, Ende ADP

World Vision started an ADP in 2014 after a thorough assessment of Ende in 2012. Measured against standard indicators of economic development needs, Ende emerged as an area where the vulnerability of children needed to be urgently addressed. 

In Ende, traditional attitudes towards children are harsh and unsympathetic. They are viewed as free labour and are often denied their right to study so that they can work to supplement the family income. Cases of physical and sexual abuse are not taken seriously and are unreported or left unsolved, affecting and scarring children emotionally and mentally. 

In terms of healthcare concerns, the main issues that compromise the health of children are the lack of access to clean water, the prevalence of unhygienic behaviours and poor sanitation systems. Approximately 40% of the community practices open defecation as there are no proper toilets. 

Also, Ende's economic development falls behind national statistics. Their main source of income is agriculture but the productivity of existing farming methods is low due to a lack of understanding, poor management, pests and diseases. 

My name is Jonmans

My birthday is on 2 Mar 2007
My favourite subject is Religious studies
I like playing Soccer

Indonesia, Ende ADP

World Vision started an ADP in 2014 after a thorough assessment of Ende in 2012. Measured against standard indicators of economic development needs, Ende emerged as an area where the vulnerability of children needed to be urgently addressed. 

In Ende, traditional attitudes towards children are harsh and unsympathetic. They are viewed as free labour and are often denied their right to study so that they can work to supplement the family income. Cases of physical and sexual abuse are not taken seriously and are unreported or left unsolved, affecting and scarring children emotionally and mentally. 

In terms of healthcare concerns, the main issues that compromise the health of children are the lack of access to clean water, the prevalence of unhygienic behaviours and poor sanitation systems. Approximately 40% of the community practices open defecation as there are no proper toilets. 

Also, Ende's economic development falls behind national statistics. Their main source of income is agriculture but the productivity of existing farming methods is low due to a lack of understanding, poor management, pests and diseases. 

My name is Makarius Notaras

My birthday is on 20 Sep 2006
My favourite subject is Religious studies
I like playing Soccer

Indonesia, Ende ADP

World Vision started an ADP in 2014 after a thorough assessment of Ende in 2012. Measured against standard indicators of economic development needs, Ende emerged as an area where the vulnerability of children needed to be urgently addressed. 

In Ende, traditional attitudes towards children are harsh and unsympathetic. They are viewed as free labour and are often denied their right to study so that they can work to supplement the family income. Cases of physical and sexual abuse are not taken seriously and are unreported or left unsolved, affecting and scarring children emotionally and mentally. 

In terms of healthcare concerns, the main issues that compromise the health of children are the lack of access to clean water, the prevalence of unhygienic behaviours and poor sanitation systems. Approximately 40% of the community practices open defecation as there are no proper toilets. 

Also, Ende's economic development falls behind national statistics. Their main source of income is agriculture but the productivity of existing farming methods is low due to a lack of understanding, poor management, pests and diseases. 

My name is Maria Magdalena Gala

My birthday is on 22 Nov 2006
My favourite subject is English
I like playing Dolls

Indonesia, Ende ADP

World Vision started an ADP in 2014 after a thorough assessment of Ende in 2012. Measured against standard indicators of economic development needs, Ende emerged as an area where the vulnerability of children needed to be urgently addressed. 

In Ende, traditional attitudes towards children are harsh and unsympathetic. They are viewed as free labour and are often denied their right to study so that they can work to supplement the family income. Cases of physical and sexual abuse are not taken seriously and are unreported or left unsolved, affecting and scarring children emotionally and mentally. 

In terms of healthcare concerns, the main issues that compromise the health of children are the lack of access to clean water, the prevalence of unhygienic behaviours and poor sanitation systems. Approximately 40% of the community practices open defecation as there are no proper toilets. 

Also, Ende's economic development falls behind national statistics. Their main source of income is agriculture but the productivity of existing farming methods is low due to a lack of understanding, poor management, pests and diseases. 

My name is Anastasia Maria

My birthday is on 21 Apr 2007
My favourite subject is Mathematics
I like playing Baseball

Indonesia, Ende ADP

World Vision started an ADP in 2014 after a thorough assessment of Ende in 2012. Measured against standard indicators of economic development needs, Ende emerged as an area where the vulnerability of children needed to be urgently addressed. 

In Ende, traditional attitudes towards children are harsh and unsympathetic. They are viewed as free labour and are often denied their right to study so that they can work to supplement the family income. Cases of physical and sexual abuse are not taken seriously and are unreported or left unsolved, affecting and scarring children emotionally and mentally. 

In terms of healthcare concerns, the main issues that compromise the health of children are the lack of access to clean water, the prevalence of unhygienic behaviours and poor sanitation systems. Approximately 40% of the community practices open defecation as there are no proper toilets. 

Also, Ende's economic development falls behind national statistics. Their main source of income is agriculture but the productivity of existing farming methods is low due to a lack of understanding, poor management, pests and diseases. 

My name is Katarina Kristofora

My birthday is on 9 Oct 2006
My favourite subject is English
I like playing Badminton

Indonesia, Ende ADP

World Vision started an ADP in 2014 after a thorough assessment of Ende in 2012. Measured against standard indicators of economic development needs, Ende emerged as an area where the vulnerability of children needed to be urgently addressed. 

In Ende, traditional attitudes towards children are harsh and unsympathetic. They are viewed as free labour and are often denied their right to study so that they can work to supplement the family income. Cases of physical and sexual abuse are not taken seriously and are unreported or left unsolved, affecting and scarring children emotionally and mentally. 

In terms of healthcare concerns, the main issues that compromise the health of children are the lack of access to clean water, the prevalence of unhygienic behaviours and poor sanitation systems. Approximately 40% of the community practices open defecation as there are no proper toilets. 

Also, Ende's economic development falls behind national statistics. Their main source of income is agriculture but the productivity of existing farming methods is low due to a lack of understanding, poor management, pests and diseases. 

My name is Thiranjana

My birthday is on 5 Sep 2008
My favourite subject is Art
I like playing Toys

Sri Lanka, Lindula ADP

World Vision has been involved with Sri Lanka’s tea estate workers for many years and Lindula ADP is an extension of this work. Tea plantation workers have been marginalised in Sri Lanka for a very long time. Originally brought in from South India over 150 years ago, they were eventually exploited for work and isolated from the rest of the country. World Vision’s interventions focus on the well-being of children to ensure that their health, nutrition, education and social needs are met.

In Lindula ADP, majority of the people work as pickers and labourers in the tea estates. They are paid daily, and when work is not available, they face a severe shortage of income.

Also, children lack proper education, and 45% of the population under 12 years old are illiterate. This is due to long travel distances, poor transport facilities and lack of finances for education resulting in a dropout rate of 14.5%, almost 10 times the national average.

In terms of healthcare and child protection challenges, 74% of people live in dismal housing. Whole families live in a single room that is linked to others to form a “line house”. There is little ventilation, no privacy, and conditions are often unsanitary. Only 67.1% of households have their own latrines and the remaining families share common latrines or defecate in open areas.

My name is SARANYA

My birthday is on 13 Oct 2006
My favourite subject is Mathematics
I like playing Local traditional games

Sri Lanka, Lindula ADP

World Vision has been involved with Sri Lanka’s tea estate workers for many years and Lindula ADP is an extension of this work. Tea plantation workers have been marginalised in Sri Lanka for a very long time. Originally brought in from South India over 150 years ago, they were eventually exploited for work and isolated from the rest of the country. World Vision’s interventions focus on the well-being of children to ensure that their health, nutrition, education and social needs are met.

In Lindula ADP, majority of the people work as pickers and labourers in the tea estates. They are paid daily, and when work is not available, they face a severe shortage of income.

Also, children lack proper education, and 45% of the population under 12 years old are illiterate. This is due to long travel distances, poor transport facilities and lack of finances for education resulting in a dropout rate of 14.5%, almost 10 times the national average.

In terms of healthcare and child protection challenges, 74% of people live in dismal housing. Whole families live in a single room that is linked to others to form a “line house”. There is little ventilation, no privacy, and conditions are often unsanitary. Only 67.1% of households have their own latrines and the remaining families share common latrines or defecate in open areas.

My name is Rifkka

My birthday is on 5 Dec 2006
My favourite subject is Local language
I like playing Ball games

Sri Lanka, Lindula ADP

World Vision has been involved with Sri Lanka’s tea estate workers for many years and Lindula ADP is an extension of this work. Tea plantation workers have been marginalised in Sri Lanka for a very long time. Originally brought in from South India over 150 years ago, they were eventually exploited for work and isolated from the rest of the country. World Vision’s interventions focus on the well-being of children to ensure that their health, nutrition, education and social needs are met.

In Lindula ADP, majority of the people work as pickers and labourers in the tea estates. They are paid daily, and when work is not available, they face a severe shortage of income.

Also, children lack proper education, and 45% of the population under 12 years old are illiterate. This is due to long travel distances, poor transport facilities and lack of finances for education resulting in a dropout rate of 14.5%, almost 10 times the national average.

In terms of healthcare and child protection challenges, 74% of people live in dismal housing. Whole families live in a single room that is linked to others to form a “line house”. There is little ventilation, no privacy, and conditions are often unsanitary. Only 67.1% of households have their own latrines and the remaining families share common latrines or defecate in open areas.

My name is Vinojini

My birthday is on 21 Sep 2006
My favourite subject is Mathematics
I like playing Marbles

Sri Lanka, Lindula ADP

World Vision has been involved with Sri Lanka’s tea estate workers for many years and Lindula ADP is an extension of this work. Tea plantation workers have been marginalised in Sri Lanka for a very long time. Originally brought in from South India over 150 years ago, they were eventually exploited for work and isolated from the rest of the country. World Vision’s interventions focus on the well-being of children to ensure that their health, nutrition, education and social needs are met.

In Lindula ADP, majority of the people work as pickers and labourers in the tea estates. They are paid daily, and when work is not available, they face a severe shortage of income.

Also, children lack proper education, and 45% of the population under 12 years old are illiterate. This is due to long travel distances, poor transport facilities and lack of finances for education resulting in a dropout rate of 14.5%, almost 10 times the national average.

In terms of healthcare and child protection challenges, 74% of people live in dismal housing. Whole families live in a single room that is linked to others to form a “line house”. There is little ventilation, no privacy, and conditions are often unsanitary. Only 67.1% of households have their own latrines and the remaining families share common latrines or defecate in open areas.

My name is Rishyanthini

My birthday is on 30 Sep 2015
My favourite subject is Writing
I like playing Toys

Sri Lanka, Lindula ADP

World Vision has been involved with Sri Lanka’s tea estate workers for many years and Lindula ADP is an extension of this work. Tea plantation workers have been marginalised in Sri Lanka for a very long time. Originally brought in from South India over 150 years ago, they were eventually exploited for work and isolated from the rest of the country. World Vision’s interventions focus on the well-being of children to ensure that their health, nutrition, education and social needs are met.

In Lindula ADP, majority of the people work as pickers and labourers in the tea estates. They are paid daily, and when work is not available, they face a severe shortage of income.

Also, children lack proper education, and 45% of the population under 12 years old are illiterate. This is due to long travel distances, poor transport facilities and lack of finances for education resulting in a dropout rate of 14.5%, almost 10 times the national average.

In terms of healthcare and child protection challenges, 74% of people live in dismal housing. Whole families live in a single room that is linked to others to form a “line house”. There is little ventilation, no privacy, and conditions are often unsanitary. Only 67.1% of households have their own latrines and the remaining families share common latrines or defecate in open areas.

My name is Sasmitha

My birthday is on 15 Jan 2016
My favourite subject is Number counting
I like playing Toys

Sri Lanka, Lindula ADP

World Vision has been involved with Sri Lanka’s tea estate workers for many years and Lindula ADP is an extension of this work. Tea plantation workers have been marginalised in Sri Lanka for a very long time. Originally brought in from South India over 150 years ago, they were eventually exploited for work and isolated from the rest of the country. World Vision’s interventions focus on the well-being of children to ensure that their health, nutrition, education and social needs are met.

In Lindula ADP, majority of the people work as pickers and labourers in the tea estates. They are paid daily, and when work is not available, they face a severe shortage of income.

Also, children lack proper education, and 45% of the population under 12 years old are illiterate. This is due to long travel distances, poor transport facilities and lack of finances for education resulting in a dropout rate of 14.5%, almost 10 times the national average.

In terms of healthcare and child protection challenges, 74% of people live in dismal housing. Whole families live in a single room that is linked to others to form a “line house”. There is little ventilation, no privacy, and conditions are often unsanitary. Only 67.1% of households have their own latrines and the remaining families share common latrines or defecate in open areas.

My name is CHAMILA

My birthday is on 1 Sep 2006
My favourite subject is Mathematics
I like playing Toys

Sri Lanka, Lindula ADP

World Vision has been involved with Sri Lanka’s tea estate workers for many years and Lindula ADP is an extension of this work. Tea plantation workers have been marginalised in Sri Lanka for a very long time. Originally brought in from South India over 150 years ago, they were eventually exploited for work and isolated from the rest of the country. World Vision’s interventions focus on the well-being of children to ensure that their health, nutrition, education and social needs are met.

In Lindula ADP, majority of the people work as pickers and labourers in the tea estates. They are paid daily, and when work is not available, they face a severe shortage of income.

Also, children lack proper education, and 45% of the population under 12 years old are illiterate. This is due to long travel distances, poor transport facilities and lack of finances for education resulting in a dropout rate of 14.5%, almost 10 times the national average.

In terms of healthcare and child protection challenges, 74% of people live in dismal housing. Whole families live in a single room that is linked to others to form a “line house”. There is little ventilation, no privacy, and conditions are often unsanitary. Only 67.1% of households have their own latrines and the remaining families share common latrines or defecate in open areas.

My name is Mahelini Niv

My birthday is on 25 Sep 2015
My favourite subject is Drawing
I like playing Toys

Sri Lanka, Lindula ADP

World Vision has been involved with Sri Lanka’s tea estate workers for many years and Lindula ADP is an extension of this work. Tea plantation workers have been marginalised in Sri Lanka for a very long time. Originally brought in from South India over 150 years ago, they were eventually exploited for work and isolated from the rest of the country. World Vision’s interventions focus on the well-being of children to ensure that their health, nutrition, education and social needs are met.

In Lindula ADP, majority of the people work as pickers and labourers in the tea estates. They are paid daily, and when work is not available, they face a severe shortage of income.

Also, children lack proper education, and 45% of the population under 12 years old are illiterate. This is due to long travel distances, poor transport facilities and lack of finances for education resulting in a dropout rate of 14.5%, almost 10 times the national average.

In terms of healthcare and child protection challenges, 74% of people live in dismal housing. Whole families live in a single room that is linked to others to form a “line house”. There is little ventilation, no privacy, and conditions are often unsanitary. Only 67.1% of households have their own latrines and the remaining families share common latrines or defecate in open areas.

My name is Dhushika

My birthday is on 14 Mar 2016
My favourite subject is None
I like playing Toys

Sri Lanka, Lindula ADP

World Vision has been involved with Sri Lanka’s tea estate workers for many years and Lindula ADP is an extension of this work. Tea plantation workers have been marginalised in Sri Lanka for a very long time. Originally brought in from South India over 150 years ago, they were eventually exploited for work and isolated from the rest of the country. World Vision’s interventions focus on the well-being of children to ensure that their health, nutrition, education and social needs are met.

In Lindula ADP, majority of the people work as pickers and labourers in the tea estates. They are paid daily, and when work is not available, they face a severe shortage of income.

Also, children lack proper education, and 45% of the population under 12 years old are illiterate. This is due to long travel distances, poor transport facilities and lack of finances for education resulting in a dropout rate of 14.5%, almost 10 times the national average.

In terms of healthcare and child protection challenges, 74% of people live in dismal housing. Whole families live in a single room that is linked to others to form a “line house”. There is little ventilation, no privacy, and conditions are often unsanitary. Only 67.1% of households have their own latrines and the remaining families share common latrines or defecate in open areas.

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